10ktruth.com - A Runner's Compendium

10kTruth.com Web Letter - June 2004

10kTruth.com Web Letter - June 2004

10kTruth.com Web Letter - June 2004 Welcome sign-ups for the 10k Truth Running Web Letter. We send these out infrequently but if even that's too often for you, abandon us now.
--------------------------------------------------------
"We will serve no group or party but will hew hard to the truth as we find it and the right as we see it. We are dedicated to the whole truth, to human values above all interests, to the rights of man as the foundation of democracy; we will take orders from none but our own conscience, and never will we overlook or misrepresent the truth to serve the interests of the powerful or cater to the ignoble in the human spirit." - Motto of The Texas Observer More Truth quotes at http://www.10ktruth.com/the_quotes/truth.htm
--------------------------------------------------------
Steep Hill Chase, 2004 Mark your calendars, folks. It's the annual Steep Hill Chase in Alton Baker Park, Eugene, Oregon (June 12). It also marks the one year anniversary of Rage's return to racing, following his devastating back injury and subsequent lumbar discectomy surgery. We caught up with him out on a run earlier this week and thought we'd check in and see how he's doing. Our 10K Truth field reporter filed this report: Q: So, Rage. How's the back? Rage: Fine. The Steep Hill Chase was my first race back, and I was pleasantly surprised with a sub-19 showing. I even passed one or two guys. The course looks great this year and should be another interesting venue, as we have come to expect from the one and only Todd Bosworth (Race Director of the Steep Hill Chase). I'd love to run it this year, but I'm going to have to scratch. It's a bunch of other aches and pains I've had since the whole back thing. Calf, hamstring, you know the drill. I just can't seem to be patient enough to build the base I need to start ramping up my training and run injury free yet. I'm starting yet another comeback and this time, I'm going to do more hills first before I go back to the track. It's just great to be finally back running pain free. I just have to be patient a bit longer and gradually work back into my speed work before I can start racing again. Q: Yeah, yeah, sure Rage. So, that pretty much translates to: "You can't run fast anymore. You can't run with Bosworth and Taylor. No team captain in their right mind would think about carrying your sorry ass on a relay team and you basically suck." Does that about cover it? Rage: Yeah. That about covers it. Q: So, is it true that we can look forward to the Rage turning to the junk mile hugger set and talking about the times he used to run, not that they were really that fast anyway, right? Rage: Hey, now wait a minute... Q: Is that shirt too small or is that actually a gut? Rage: I'm outa here.
--------------------------------------------------------
10k Truth Q & A - Q: What's as American as apple pie, Arnold Palmer and Michael Jackson hoopla? A: The Fourth of July Butte to Butte Race in Eugene, Oregon. Q: Hi, I found your site tonight while conducting a Google search looking for a map of the Butte to Butte course. First, let me say that I like your page! Nice job! Second, do you know if there is a map of the Butte to Butte on the web? I've never run in a race and I'm going to run in the Butte to Butte this year. I'm slow, but it's a start. When I say slow, I mean it. If could average 8 minutes/mile in the Butte I'd be ecstatic! If you could offer me any advice on how far to run each day or advice on training for that first hill that I hear so much about, I would really appreciate it! Thanks in advance! - D.P. A: The best thing I can do for you is have you read my race report: http://www.10ktruth.com/the_races/butte.htm Don't over-stress yourself on the first hill. Manciata gave me the best advice for this course: The race starts on West Amazon. That's the best tip for race tactics. Now, for preparation, if you want to get prepared, find some terrain where you can run uphill continuously for 30 minutes minimum. That way, come race day, going up the first hill won't seem so bad. If you can't, try doing hill intervals. Go about 90 seconds. Rest on the way down to do the next one and turn around and do five more or so. Do this workout once a week. Good luck! The Rage For the Butte to Butte course description and Butte to Butte Race Registration at - http://www.buttetobutte.org/
-------------------------------------------------------
"Wellness is the key to a long and healthy life. Many people have the wrong perception of it. Wellness is from the neck up, and fitness from the neck down. Too many people work out every day, but go around with the worst attitudes, which just wastes all their physical efforts." - Reader's comment sent in to Bob Welch, columnist for The Register-Guard, Eugene, Oregon - More Training Quotes at: http://www.10ktruth.com/the_quotes/train.htm
-------------------------------------------------------
Pre Classic Mile Gets Even More Interesting - http://www.10ktruth.com/the_rage/rage.htm Alan Webb. Meet Galen Rupp. You can bet the comparisons will be made at the 2004 Prefontaine Classic in Eugene, Oregon. No. This kid isn't going to break Webb's national prep record, previously held by Jim Ryan for about forty years, or so. But I'll bet he breaks 4:00 minutes and maybe even 3:58. Not bad for a kid just out of high school. He's certainly capable. On May 29, Rupp, a senior from Central Catholic High School, won the Oregon 3000 meter boys prep 4A title in 8:22, which was even more impressive by the fact that he ran the last 1000 meters as if he were saving himself for the 1500 final the next day, which he also won in a state meet record time of 3:49. Rupp also ran a national prep best at 3:45 earlier this year. For the 3000 final, I was standing about 20 feet from his coach, Alberto Salazar on the north end of the track trying to make out what Salazar was yelling as Rupp looked over at his coach with each lap. What was amazing was how easy he made 8:22 look, and how much time he left on the track over the last two and a half laps, which had some folks wondering what might have been. When Steve Prefontaine holds the record at 8:08 and a 17 year-old phenom is being screamed at by a University of Oregon legend, it doesn't get much better than that, folks. What more could you ask for? Some left the track unsatisfied that he didn't empty the tank chasing Pre's record. Even Stuart Eagon, the runner up, apologized to fans for not pushing the pace earlier. He ran 8:28. I don't think either athlete needs to apologize to anyone. I was impressed by both of them. Anyone wonder what it must be like to be mentioned in the same breath as Steve Prefontaine? Especially when you're 17? Yeah, he looked around too much and could have at least waited until the finish like Pre always did, staring across the track as if disgusted he wasn't already there by now and looking back over his shoulder only after he had immediately crossed the finish line only to confirm how far he had beaten his nearest pursuer. Salazar will teach him killer instincts later. Right now, Rupp is a 17 year-old double state champion by listening to his coach. He said after the 1500 that it was the most rested he had felt all season. My guess is Salazar had a lot to do with putting him in that position. Sounds like he listened to his coach and executed the plan perfectly. Pre would have wanted one thing above anything else: To win. And boy, did he ever. So did Galen Rupp. And so will Galen Rupp. And that's The Truth.
-------------------------------------------------------
"The idea of losing the three at Hayward Field and the idea of losing my specialty to someone who wasn't running his specialty. Mostly, the idea of losing in front of my people. They haven't forgotten about me." - Steve Prefontaine, when asked by a reporter how he managed to muster up enough strength on the last 200 to catch Frank Shorter by .6 of a second and establish a new American 5000 meter record at 12:51.4. "From now on, I'm going to be a dirty son of a bitch. I'm going to foul a lot of people. I'll get thrown out of a few races, but it's time we Americans learned to run like the Europeans." - Steve Prefontaine in an interview with Bert Nelson of Track & Field News, following his courageous run at a gold medal at the 1972 Olympics, after being cut off twice by Mohamed Gamoudi of Tunisia in the 5000 meter final, who edged an exhausted Pre in the last five meters for the bronze medal. More Running Quotes at: http://www.10ktruth.com/the_quotes/run.htm
-------------------------------------------------------
*** Eastern Washington Acreage within Kittitas County, Washington *** When you are ready to flee Pugetropolis for good (or the concrete jungle you inhabit that exhibits all the creature discomforts found in Western Washington with its crush of people queued for coffee or coffined in cars on the crawl roads known as freeways) come to Vanderbilt Country Estates located within the orchard districts of the south hills of the Kittitas Valley on the remote side of the Cascade Mountains in Washington State. It is an exclusive, high-class residential development in a unique private rural agricultural setting. Covenants are attached to land sales to protect the overall quality of the entire development. Kittitas Valley views abound Fruitful orchards all around Live your life at nature's pace Vanderbilt Country Estates. - Photos, lot descriptions and contact information at: http://www.vanderbiltcountryestates.com
--------------------------------------------------------
The Dina, K.C. & Boz Rule at 2004 Rhody Run - http://www.10ktruth.com/the_races/rhody.htm So, what do T-Bone, Rage & Arnie have in common? Two things. Yes, all three have golf swings that are not too terribly pleasant to the eye, and yes, neither of them was at the 2004 Rhody Run. But, the third one is what we were looking for here. The not-too-subtle connection for golf and running purists is the direct similarity between Arnie paving the way for U.S. players to cross the pond to play in the British Open and T-Bone and Rage re-opening the floodgates from the Willamette Valley to Florence to the old-guys-still-can-race set. Yes, The Rhody Run is back. Just ask The Dina (Steve Dinatale), K.C. (K.C. Taylor) and Boz (Todd Bosworth), who finished 1-2-3 at the 2004 Rhododendron Festival in Florence, Oregon on May 18. While Bone and Rage soaked up the media coverage with their back-to-back top three finishes in 2001 and 2002, including a win, you could darn near guess what Dina, K.C. and Boz were thinking as they choked down the race results over their Monday morning coffee a short couple of years ago: "How could we possibly have let these two pukes sandbag any hardware in any 10k, especially one that's only 60 miles away?" It's one thing to watch Arnie walk over the bridge at St. Andrews and wave to the crowd one last time. It's another to see some skinny bald guy in serious mid life crisis high-fiving the bikers unchallenged down streets of Old Towne Florence. Give me a break. So, even if the Rage and T-Bone didn't remotely resemble Arnie that day, the path was blazed and fire was lit. Especially with Dina. He has never lost the Rhody Run. He's had four finishes and has four wins, but K.C. and Boz weren't just going to hand it to him by sleeping in that Saturday morning, either. As expected, Dina ran well (35:46) to win it and K.C. and Boz (37:43) duked it out for four miles before K.C. opened a half-minute gap and held it to finish second in 37:14. Their 1-2-3 places in the overall results were also the first three spots in the 45-49 age group division. Nevertheless, the historical significance and legacy of Rage and T-Bone's 2001 and 2002 trail blazing trips is inescapable, starting with the string of three successive skinhead champions, which more than one curious on-looker took note of. Even the crowd murmured as The Dina powered his way down Front Street "...it's Rage...no, wait...IT'S DINA! GO DINA!" ...and the lore of the Rhody Run continues to grow, and T-Bone has already shaved his head. And that's The Truth.
--------------------------------------------------------
Trail Running for Yuppies: Guest Rage by Michael Logsdon - More at FuriousM.com. Somehow we ended up with a National Geographic Adventure magazine at my house, and thumbing through it was not a pleasant experience. The introduction to trail running spread made me want to throw up. There were pictures of a lady with a heart rate monitor, an mp3 player with headphones, and a camelback water dispenser. I think that kind of misses the point of trail running. The idea of trail running is to get away from the highly structured modern world and just run on a dirt path. The article was also full of great advice, like "gaze at least five feet down the path, and plan two steps ahead." If you're so stupid that need a magazine to tell you to watch your step on uneven terrain, trail running probably isn't the best hobby for you. Then, in a part about the importance of balance it said "Rocks can rotate, gravel can slide, and roots can be slippery..." Really? I had no idea. I thought natural terrain was identical to pavement. The worst part is that they call these statements of the obvious "technical pointers." The article also had gear recommendations. My favorite was, "The HighGear Axis Altimeter Watch ($149) is both feature-laden and affordable." I can think of some better adjectives than "affordable" to describe a 150 dollar watch. Personally, I favor the low tech approach. I don't remember how much I paid for my watch, but I bet it was under fifteen dollars. Instead of a camelback water dispenser I carry a water bottle, unless I know I'll be back in under an hour, then I don't carry any water at all. When I climb Lazy Mountain in the winter, instead of buying crampons or some fancy schmancy stabil-icers at rei, I drill screws through the soles of my shoes. The people that article was written for disgrace trail running. The real men and women are the ones who run the Matanuska Peak Challenge, thirteen miles up and down 9,000 vertical feet. My hat goes off to them. I'd like to point out here that I extend my cheapness towards running to all aspects of my life, like skiing. Recently, I bought telemark bindings and had them mounted on my old downhill skis. The only problem was that new telemark boots cost 450 dollars, so I did the only honorable thing; I used some leather boots from the 70s that were in our shed. When I golf I still use my spaghetti shaft POS sports authority irons. For a while I had a Callaway driver that I got for my birthday three years ago. Unfortunately, it was an original Callaway driver from 1989. Long story short, I was at the driving range one day when I swung the club and the head flew off. It went damn near 80 yards, but I retrieved it and we got it reshafted. It happened again. We got it reshafted again. It happened again and we just gave up. But there is a happy ending; I got a newer Callaway driver and shot an 82 at Palmer Golf Course last summer. PGA tour here I come. Anyway, I'd better get back to the subject of trail running. - Continued at: http://www.10ktruth.com/the_rage/guest-rage.htm#trails
-------------------------------------------------------
"The most beautiful thing in the world is, of course, the world itself." - Wallace Stevens More quotes on the Best of the Most at http://www.10ktruth.com/the_quotes/most_valuable.htm
--------------------------------------------------------

Copyright 2004, Mike Logan, Bruce Manclark & Cory Eberhart. All Rights Reserved


[ Home ] [ Races ]
[ Rage ] [ Guest Rage ]
[ Result ] [ Road ]
[ RunnerSpeak ]
[Q&A ] [ Q&A Archives ]
[ Quotes ] [ Links ] [ Site Map ]